Eco-Play is a Non-Trivial Problem

Green energy

Since 2006 I have had an avocation of studying the impact of climate change and its relationship to economics. As we are in the process of setting up Constructive Playgrounds consulting, I’ve taken what I’ve learned and tried to work that into our business plan which turns out to be much harder than I ever expected. Oh, making a greener product is not that hard. Several toy companies do a great job of that, and my favorite is Green Toys.

The problem, as Tesla and the other makers of electric cars are finding out, is that you can be as green as possible, but there are many externalities of which you have no control that makes your work far less than green. As Bloomberg recently reported the electricity that powers those vehicles is often anything but green.

This grim fact forces us to look at the whole transportation issue. Should everyone have the right to drive their own personal vehicle that uses a tremendous amount of resources to create and sits idle for the bulk of its existence?

As we consider creating apparatus and venues for new types of play, we must think about the whole question of the total impact of such a venture. For example, could we recycle plastic and use it to print equipment locally and thus reduce both waste and transportation? How about creating equipment that is extremely durable and provide a support system of lending libraries so that the gear is used for many generations?

There have been various strategies employed in the past. My first commercial venture was with BigToys, and we used peeler cores left over from producing plywood and used tires. As the business grew, it became increasingly difficult to continue to use such materials because of their inconsistencies and, frankly customer preference. While BigToys continues to exist under new ownership the current product is a far cry from its roots. Play Mart and PDPlay companies make commercial playground equipment using mostly recycled content with modest success.

My other advocation, or maybe an obsession, over the past decade, has been trying to understand what it will take to solve the housing problem. My focus has mainly been here in Sonoma County, but the issue is worldwide. What I’ve learned is that there are good technical and economic solutions, but at its core, the problem is really about the attitudes of the public and entrenched standards and practices. The conclusion I’ve come to is that change to the housing crisis will require a proliferation of excellent solutions on the one hand and increasingly dire environmental conditions that force more drastic change on the other hand.

Applying the same logic to Eco-Play, we must strive to create excellent examples and that the products will have to be extraordinary goes without saying. But it will also require a complete package that makes this business one that matches the green consumer’s preferred lifestyle. An excellent example of this is the inhabiatots website that curates all things green and cool for kids. They display many successful ventures that successful at creating such systems.

As I have stated so often in this blog, the focus should not be on products but on systems, and the core intent is what is best for kids which includes ensuring that there is a livable planet in their future.

Maybe I’m a bit crazy about this but I’m not alone. Check out what Lego is doing

lego green.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s