Almost Everything We Do to Educate Children is Wrong

Reading

In the past couple of decades, there has been an explosion of new information about how children’s minds and bodies develop. Perhaps it shouldn’t come as a surprise, but most of our assumptions about child rearing and education are flat out wrong.

We are far enough along this discovery process to go beyond just recapitulating the studies. It’s time to begin to look at the revolutionary social changes that must and will take place over the next decade as we put into practice the consequences of our new-found knowledge.

Take education for example where the most noticeable change that has already begun is the transition to Inquiry-Based learning. I will acknowledge that much of this change is still too structured and curriculum driven, but the trend is strong and will become the dominant approach to education over the next decade. Along the way, the draconian practice of finals exams that test nothing of importance and negatively impact learning will fall by the wayside. Perhaps we will even see the most dramatic change of all, a later start to the school day.

It’s not just the big systems that will change but also how the systems interact and intersect. I’ve been exploring writing children’s books and have come to realize that the whole system is broken. While there are great writer’s and artists doing excellent work, the publishing industry seems to be hell-bent on killing the goose that lays the golden eggs by so gaming the system that the creative talent is one of the least compensated as a proportion of the overall gross revenue of any industry.

But it’s not just the publication of books that is broken. Look at how libraries manage books for young children. We know that reading the same books to your child over and over makes them smarter. That means the books have to be at home for years, not weeks. How do we fix this?

Or how about Storyline Online? They do a fantastic job of creating free videos of very well curated children’s books that are read by A-list actors. They even produce excellent parent and teacher activity guides to accompany each book. What they miss is one of the essential elements, helping parents understand that children benefit most when they do the reading not some actor on a screen. And it would be so easy to have that A-list actor add a second video talking to the parent about the important bonding and learning that takes place as they read the stories repeatedly. The final link is access for low income residents to children’s books for longer periods than libraries now allow.

The people who know how important it is for parents to read to their children is First Five California. They even have a nice budget to pay for great television ads to promote this idea. Visit their website to see what a really great program it is. But what about the parent who saw the spot touting reading to their kid? Any links, any follow through? Nope. How hard would it be for First Five and Storyline Online to coordinate their campaigns?

OK, I think you get my point. Good intentions are not enough! Is your intention to make excellent videos of actors reading books? Is it your intention to admonish parents to read to their kids? Or should you intend to get up to date on the current science, look for other organizations in the same space with whom you can coordinate and do so and maximize the benefits to children?

One thought on “Almost Everything We Do to Educate Children is Wrong

  1. I could not agree more. Our education system is not geared toward introspection and change to create truly curious and active learners, it is all about goals and measuring, which forces that evil, standardization. So, our fight back, taking parental time reading and interacting with our kids is a powerful curative. We did it with our kids, and I can see the difference on so many levels. I even took the TV out of the house for a year, and they had a blast! My advice? Kill your TV, and do stuff, including reading to your kids and yourself.

    Like

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